4 Reasons Why You Are Not Seeing Any Results from Your Workout

Investing your time & effort to workout will be frustrating if you aren’t seeing any results. It’s also not very motivating to keep going and it can be a source of discouragement. But getting results involves many factors like nutrition & recovery. What you do in your training, nutrition & recovery will dictate the type of results you will get. Let’s discuss four reasons why you aren’t seeing results.

  1. You’re overeating and aren’t tracking your food.

If your goal is to lose weight, it is essential that you track your food so that you can eat below your calorie limit. The goal is to create a deficit of intake compared to your calories burned. More often than not, our concept of eating less may even still be a calorie surplus and you’d be surprised with how much you’re eating once you start tracking your food. Remember that when you pair exercise with a calorie deficit, the result is fat burn. On the flip side, when you pair exercise with a calorie deficit, the result can be muscle gain and weight gain.

  1. You’re not training enough.

As you train, you are constantly building muscles and your metabolism. The higher metabolism you build, the higher the deficit you are creating to allow you to burn more fat efficiently. World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 150 minutes per week of high-intensity training (HIT). As you train, you should be able to feel the benefits of training as well as having more energy and being more focused. Make sure you to train at least thrice a week to see results!

  1. You’re not recovering well enough.

Often times, recovery is the one component of training that is disregarded. You don’t see results during the workout but you see it during recovery. The amount of sleep you take also determines how fast you see results. Remember that as you train, you are constantly creating muscle tears and if you have time for recovery, your body will eventually reach a breaking point, and an injury. Food is also a key factor in recovery. Since our muscles are made up of protein, you also need protein to recover. You’re not just trying to recover your muscles, but your energy as well. Training depletes your energy and you recover it back through the food that you eat.

  1. Not enough time.

Whether your goal is to lose weight/fat or gain muscles, it takes time to achieve those goals. Allow yourself at least 12 weeks of continuous training to see visible results. Results are inevitable when you do the work and you’re realistic with the process. In the 12 weeks of training, results can be seen through your weight, strength gain, and loss of girth around your body.

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